I have a new blog post at 2nd Quadrant, called “Data Modelling – It’s a lot more than just a diagram” (illustrated with #PowerDesigner) #DataVault

https://blog.2ndquadrant.com/data-modelling-lot-just-diagram/

 

“#PowerDesigner Fundamentals for Data Architects” at Data Modelling Zone EU 2018 #DMZone

Are you thinking of attending Data Modelling Zone in Düsseldorf in September 2018?

  • Are you an experienced data architect, new to SAP PowerDesigner?
  • Have you used SAP PowerDesigner in the past, and need bringing up to date?
  • Are you currently using SAP PowerDesigner, but never had any training?
  • Are you evaluating SAP PowerDesigner?

– then –

This session is for you!

Join the author of Data Modelling Made Simple with PowerDesigner, and learn the Fundamental techniques you need to get the best out of SAP PowerDesigner.

The program hasn’t been announced yet, so watch the conference web site for announcements.

 

 

#PowerDesigner adds support for Amazon #Redshift

Late last year, SAP issued Service Pack 5 for PowerDesigner 16.6. From the list of new features, it’s obvious that SAP are putting a lot of focus on the web-editing capabilities of the tool. In this service pack, there are changes that affect process modellers, enterprise architects, requirements modellers, and data architects. I shan’t list them all here – see the note below for details of how to access them yourself.

I’m going to focus on what matters to data architects – the new support for Amazon Redshift. SAP have done the usual excellent job of enhancing the underlying database support in the Physical Data Model (PDM) in order to handle this DBMS. For example, they’ve added a new type of object, “External Schema”, and extended the properties available for Tables, Columns, Views, and Users. The latter includes recognising Schemas as a Stereotype of User.

For example, here’s the new ‘general’ tab for a column – I’ve highlighted some of the new properties for you.

Redshift column

To find out more about these new features, follow these two simple steps:

·        Search for PowerDesigner stuff on SAP.com – https://help.sap.com/viewer/p/SAP_POWERDESIGNER

·        click on the “New Features Summary” link

 

click here for more

Work smarter with #PowerDesigner – Choosing your Conversion Table

In yesterday’s blog post, I described how to convert CamelCase object Codes into ‘Proper Case’ object Names, using a combination of GTL and VBScript in a model extension. This took advantage of the built-in conversion routines, which enable us to convert abbreviations into plain language, such as replacing “acct” with “account”.

I didn’t show you how to tell PowerDesigner where to look for those abbreviations, so that’s what I’m going to do now. The secret lies with the Naming Conventions in the Model Options. There are three ways to access the Model Options:

  • near the bottom of the Tools menu
  • right-click the model in the Browser
  • right-click a blank area of a diagram

Click on the “Naming Conventions” section, then on the “Code to name” sub-tab, as shown below.  You need to do two things:

  1. Select “Enable conversions”
  2. Choose from the drop-down list of conversion tables – in the example below, I’ve chosen one of my CSV files

PDM model options - conversion table

The drop-down list of conversion tables will include entries from the following sources:

  • if you have a repository, one entry for ‘glossary terms’ (these are the Terms in the PowerDesigner Glossary)
  • CSV files that have been checked into the ‘Library’ folder in the repository
  • CSV files in the target folder(s). Click on the folder icon to the right of the drop-down to change the target folders – the default folder is “C:\Program Files\SAP\PowerDesigner 16\Resource Files\Conversion Tables”, which contains a single sample, called “stdnames.csv”, so you’ll probably want to add at least one more folder to the list.

You can edit your conversion table directly, without using Excel – just click on the ‘Edit Selected Conversion Table’ button.

edit selected conversion table

Each time you run the menu options I showed you yesterday, it will use the current conversion table. If, for example, you haven’t defined ‘BBC’ as an abbreviation, the code ‘BBCNews’ will be converted to ‘BBC News’. If you decide that ‘BBC’ should be converted to “British Broadcasting Corporation”, just add the following entry to your conversion table, and run the menu options again.

British Broadcasting Corporation BBC

Lastly, it’s worth pointing out that the Conversion table that you select on the Naming Conventions tab is used for every type of object, unless you select a different Conversion table in one of the object-specific sections. In this example, I’ve chosen a different Conversion table for Columns:

naming for columns

So, you could use different conversion tables for different types of object, if you want to.